MMus Musicology

Academic Year 2020/2021

Graduate Taught (level 9 nfq, credits 90)

The UCD School of Music is one of the leading centres for graduate musical study in Ireland. Our graduate programme gives students the opportunity to work with scholars of international standing in the School’s core disciplines of historical musicology and ethnomusicology. The programme encourages interdisciplinary study by enabling students to take modules in both these areas, while also facilitating specialisation. The MMus degree furnishes students with the core intellectual tools for pursuing musical research, whilst also encouraging independent scholarship.

 

  • Students will develop a comprehensive grounding in the core disciplinary strengths of historical musicology and ethnomusicology.
  • Encourage inter-disciplinary study, by enabling students to take modules in all of these areas, whilst also facilitating specialisation.

Careers & Employability

Many alumni of the MMus Degree have gone on to successful careers in arts administration, journalism, and teaching. Recent graduates have also gone on to pursue doctoral work at internationally-renowned institutions such as Cambridge, King’s College London, Royal Irish Academy of Music, lecturer positions at Royal Holloway, Goldsmiths (London), Birmingham and Sydney Conservatoires, as well as positions with the BBC and RTÉ (radio and television).

Curricular information is subject to change


Full Time option suitable for:

Domestic(EEA) applicants: Yes
International (Non EEA) applicants currently residing outside of the EEA Region. Yes

Part Time option suitable for:

Domestic(EEA) applicants: Yes
International (Non EEA) applicants currently residing outside of the EEA Region. No

The Master of Musicology degree will appeal to students who wish to prepare for further research in Music and to those who wish to gain a deeper understanding of historical musicology and ethnomusicology. The programme aims to develop students’ analytical research skills and independent critical and reflective thinking and writing, within a supportive research-oriented environment.
We value ambition, dedication, and passion for music in all its forms: critical reflection on music, performance to the highest professional standards, and engagement with composition through analysis, reflection and the creative process
The programme gives students an opportunity to work with scholars of international standing in the School’s core disciplines of historical musicology and ethnomusicology. The MMus degree furnishes students with the core intellectual tools for pursuing musical research, whilst also encouraging independent scholarship.
The degree emphasises progression from taught foundational modules, through focused case studies reflecting the School's major research strengths, to opportunities for independent research. Teaching is in small seminars and requires intensive student preparation. The Graduate Colloquium enables students to present autonomous research (a twenty-minute paper) in a supportive peer environment. The programme culminates in the writing of a research dissertation on a topic of the student’s choosing.

  • On completion of the programme students should - have developed a specialised understanding of the principal developments and trends within the core disciplines of historical musicology and ethnomusicology and be conversant with a wide range of methodological and interdisciplinary approaches.
  • be able to undertake independent research and deal confidently with the various forms of primary evidence available for research in Musicology.
  • be able to analyse primary evidence, place it in context, and assess its reliability.
  • demonstrate critical understanding of diverse academic viewpoints.
  • be able to deliver oral presentations clearly and confidently, and engage constructively in group discussions.
  • demonstrate the ability to participate appropriately in an academic community.
  • have developed solid writing skills including the ability to engage in rigorous and original research-based work.
  • have developed a range of transferable skills and experience, including disciplined work methods, rigorous, and analytical and imaginative thinking, which would facilitate scholarly progression in Musicology and Music, but also within a wide range of professional contexts.

On completion of the programme students should:

  • Have developed a specialised understanding of the principal developments and trends within the core disciplines of historical musicology and ethnomusicology and be conversant with a wide range of methodological and interdisciplinary approaches.
  • Be able to analyse primary evidence, place it in context, and assess its reliability.
  • Be able to deliver oral presentations clearly and confidently, and engage constructively in group discussions.
  • Be able to undertake independent research and deal confidently with the various forms of primary evidence available for research in Musicology.
  • Demonstrate critical understanding of diverse academic viewpoints.
  • Demonstrate the ability to participate appropriately in an academic community.
  • Have developed a range of transferable skills and experience, including disciplined work methods, rigorous, and analytical and imaginative thinking, which would facilitate scholarly progression in Musicology and Music, but also within a wide range of professional contexts.
  • Have developed solid writing skills including the ability to engage in rigorous and original research-based work.

View All Modules Here

Students study a range of research and foundational modules: 

  • Research Methods Seminar
  • Graduate Colloquium
  • Dissertation
  • Musicology, Criticism and Cultural History 
  • Ethnomusicology: Theory and Method 

Students will also choose two other 10 credit modules from the suite of specialist modules on offer.

Tuition fee information is available on the UCD Fees website. Please note that UCD offers a number of graduate scholarships for full-time, self-funding international students, holding an offer of a place on a UCD graduate degree programme. For further information please see International Scholarships.

A Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor in a cognate area with a minimum 2.1 or an equivalent of a UCD GPA of 3.08  (NFQ Level 8 ) or equivalent.  Cognate areas include Music, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music Education and Performance Studies.  In some cases the School of Music will accept applicants from English, History, Sociology and Anthropology.  However, the School will first assess the applicant's ability to read musicial notation and engage with Music Theory. Written sample work (1000-4000 words)and two positive academic references.   Applicants whose first language is not English are also required to submit evidence of their English language proficiency.  It is expected that applicants will normally have reached an overall 7.0 in IELTS, with no individual band lower than 6.5, or equivalent.

These are the minimum entry requirements – additional criteria may be requested for some programmes 

 

 

Anaïs Verhulst, Belgium, 
Current PhD student funded by the Irish Research Council. 

I was first introduced to ethnomusicology during my Erasmus year in UCD. After completing a BA and MA in (historical) musicology in Belgium, I decided to pursue my interests in ethnomusicology and apply for the MMus programme offered by the UCD School of Music. The comprehensive range of modules, the importance of ethnomusicology within the school and the expertise of the supportive staff attracted me to return to Ireland and the School of Music. The various core and elective modules covered the theoretical concepts and practical skills of ethnomusicological research, while encouraging students into interdisciplinary engagement with the school’s two other music strands, musicology and analysis. Outside of  study hours, the UCD Gamelan Orchestra allowed me to broaden my musical horizons in a practical way. The intellectually stimulating learning experience of the MMus has placed me in a strong position to continue postgraduate research.
 

Kayleigh Ferguson
MMus 2017

The MMus at UCD offers immersive study in both special areas of interest and the core debates and issues in musicology. The program has a brilliant, diverse network of faculty that implements an excellent balance of both structured guidance and the freedom to explore and answer questions for one’s self. This freedom extends well out of lectures and into the practical world of research, and I finished my coursework with confidence in my musicological education. I made lifelong friends and colleagues in the School of Music and remain in collaboration with them, in Ireland and abroad.

The UCD School of Music plays a pivotal role in musicology in Ireland and maintains fruitful relationships with musical and cultural institutions in Dublin. It is also home to a vibrant performance culture showcased in its instrumental and vocal ensembles. The school has particular expertise in Irish music and recently developed an innovative programme on music in Ireland. UCD also has a number of resident performing ensembles, including UCD Choral Scholars, UCD Symphony Orchestra and UCD Philharmonic Choir, while the Ad Astra academy offers a number of performing arts scholarships. 

Applications are not currently open