HIS10450 Radicals and Revolutionaries

Academic Year 2020/2021

What does the world look like when viewed from the perspective of those who seek to challenge the status quo? How do provocative and disruptive ideas emerge, take root and ultimately re-shape the world around us? And why do others become contested, discredited or otherwise unappealing? Join us on an exploration of key moments in global history where challenges to dominant ‘western’ ideas, social norms, political hierarchies and cultural behaviours have shaken accepted truths, myths and realities. This course offers an introductory overview to eight critical episodes from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first centuries, travelling around the globe to take in North, South and Latin America, the Middle East, Russia, and Africa. In doing so, we will encounter individuals, groups, communities and states who have sought to confront the mainstream by proposing radical social and political alternatives.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this module, students be able to:
Show awareness and understanding of key moments in global history where challenges to the mainstream have emerged;
Demonstrate skills in the analysis of primary source materials;
Research and write an essay to the standard of a level 1 student of history;
Contribute in a meaningful way to class discussions.

Indicative Module Content:

Indicative content may include:
Week 1 | Introduction: Doing radical history
Week 2 | Abolitionism
Week 3 | Anti-capital
Week 4 | Feminism
Week 5 | Reading week
Week 6 |Race
Week 7 |Decolonisation, religion
Week 8 | Gay liberation
Week 9 | Industry/technology
Week 10 | Political violence/terrorism

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Lectures

9

Seminar (or Webinar)

9

Specified Learning Activities

45

Autonomous Student Learning

45

Total

108

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
This module combines large-group and small-group teaching via a weekly lecture and seminar. Lectures provide an overview of the topic, while seminars focus on discussion of primary and secondary sources pertaining to the broader theme. Autonomous learning is fostered through required reading each week, and through preparation of summative written assignments. Key research, writing and citation skills are explicitly incorporated into seminar work and are reinforced in summative assignments. 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations

Not applicable to this module.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Assignment: Mid-term essay planning exercise Unspecified n/a Graded No

20

Continuous Assessment: Students are graded on their contribution to seminars throughout the semester, whether remote or on-campus Throughout the Trimester n/a Graded No

30

Essay: An essay of 1500 words, to be submitted at the end of week 12 Week 12 n/a Graded No

50


Carry forward of passed components
No
 
Resit In Terminal Exam
Spring No
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Feedback on the mid-term essay plan assignment is given in writing (via brightspace) on the submitted copy. Feedback in class (on campus or online) verbally throughout the semester in relation to continuous assessment. Feedback on the end-of-semester essay is provided in writing (via brightspace). Verbal feedback may be given by appointment in one-to-one meetings if appropriate/feasible at that time.

Name Role
Dr Hussein Omar Lecturer / Co-Lecturer
Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.

Please note: this module is available to Stage 1 undergraduate students. Therefore, teaching in the Autumn trimester will commence from the week beginning 28 September 2020. 
Autumn
       
Lecture Offering 2 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 12:00 - 12:50 Online
Seminar Offering 1 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 13:00 - 13:50 Online
Seminar Offering 2 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 14:00 - 14:50 Online
Seminar Offering 3 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 14:00 - 14:50 Online
Seminar Offering 4 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 15:00 - 15:50 Online
Seminar Offering 5 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 15:00 - 15:50 Online
Seminar Offering 6 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 16:00 - 16:50 Online
Seminar Offering 7 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 16:00 - 16:50 Online
Seminar Offering 8 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Tues 17:00 - 17:50 Online
Seminar Offering 9 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 10:00 - 10:50 Online
Seminar Offering 10 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 10:00 - 10:50 Online
Seminar Offering 11 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 11:00 - 11:50 Online
Seminar Offering 12 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 11:00 - 11:50 Online
Seminar Offering 13 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 12:00 - 12:50 Online
Seminar Offering 14 Week(s) - Autumn: Weeks 2-12 Wed 12:00 - 12:50 Online
Autumn