HIS10440 The United States, 1776-1991

Academic Year 2020/2021

This module explores the development of the United States from the founding of the republic to the end of the Cold War, from the creation of a federal government with limits on its powers to the emergence of the United States as a sole superpower. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of government in the United States and the development of distinct ideas about American national identity. Students will explore the issues and ideas that led to the thirteen colonies uniting to form a new country, and they will consider the ways in which expansion westwards impacted American identities and national purpose. The Civil War of 1861-1865—the bloodiest conflict in American history—and its aftermath led to the ending of slavery but did not end racial division and White supremacy. Immigration, economic growth and overseas expansion in the late 19th century began the process of transforming the United States from a regional to a world power, while World War II and the Cold War dramatically altered both government and society. Students will closely examine one journal article per week to explore questions of government, race relations, political identities, and Americans' engagement with the world over an extended period of time.

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Curricular information is subject to change

Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this module students should have:
• Further developed their understanding of essential skills for history students;
• Advanced their appreciation of how history is studied at university level;
• Acquired a critical approach to evidence and an ability to study and learn more effectively;
• Developed their powers of expression, both orally and in writing;
• Developed their ability to appreciate and analyse the development of the United States from the founding of the republic to the end of the Cold War;
• Developed their understanding of the dynamic social, political, economic, ideological, and external forces at play in America’s development.

Indicative Module Content:

Week 1: Founding a Republic and Building a Democracy
Week 2: Westward Expansion
Week 3: The Civil War
Week 4: Reconstruction and the Politics of Reform
Week 5: Immigration, Empire, and the “Global” United States
Week 6: The Great Depression and World War II
Week 7: Cold War Society
Week 8: READING WEEK
Week 9: Civil Rights
Week 10: Social Revolutions and Counter-revolution
Week 11: America in the World
Week 12: Revision Lecture

Student Effort Hours: 
Student Effort Type Hours
Lectures

11

Seminar (or Webinar)

10

Specified Learning Activities

45

Autonomous Student Learning

45

Total

111

Approaches to Teaching and Learning:
Students will attend one lecture and one seminar per week. The lectures will introduce students to the weekly topic and explore the ways in which historians have examined the issues under consideration. The seminar will provide an opportunity for students to engage in more in-depth discussion of the topic, with a particular focus on the required reading. 
Requirements, Exclusions and Recommendations

Not applicable to this module.


Module Requisites and Incompatibles
Not applicable to this module.
 
Assessment Strategy  
Description Timing Open Book Exam Component Scale Must Pass Component % of Final Grade
Continuous Assessment: Seminar contribution and related activities Throughout the Trimester n/a Graded No

35

Essay: End-of-semester essay Week 12 n/a Graded No

40

Assignment: Mid-semester essay preparation exercise Week 6 n/a Graded No

25


Carry forward of passed components
No
 
Remediation Type Remediation Timing
In-Module Resit Prior to relevant Programme Exam Board
Please see Student Jargon Buster for more information about remediation types and timing. 
Feedback Strategy/Strategies

• Feedback individually to students, post-assessment

How will my Feedback be Delivered?

Not yet recorded.

Name Role
Dr Aaron Donaghy Tutor
Dr Chiara Tedaldi Tutor
Mr Thomas Tormey Tutor
Timetabling information is displayed only for guidance purposes, relates to the current Academic Year only and is subject to change.

 
Spring
     
Lecture Offering 1 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 12:00 - 12:50
Seminar Offering 1 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 13:00 - 13:50
Seminar Offering 2 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 14:00 - 14:50
Seminar Offering 3 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 14:00 - 14:50
Seminar Offering 4 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 15:00 - 15:50
Seminar Offering 5 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 15:00 - 15:50
Seminar Offering 6 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 16:00 - 16:50
Seminar Offering 8 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Tues 17:00 - 17:50
Seminar Offering 9 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 10:00 - 10:50
Seminar Offering 10 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 10:00 - 10:50
Seminar Offering 11 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 11:00 - 11:50
Seminar Offering 12 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 11:00 - 11:50
Seminar Offering 13 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 12:00 - 12:50
Seminar Offering 14 Week(s) - 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Wed 12:00 - 12:50
Spring