Zoology (ZOS1)

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The BSc Zoology programme is aimed at students who wish to equip themselves with a broad knowledge of animals (their structure, behaviour, classification, development, genetics, genomics, cell biology, physiology, and ecology). Our students will become graduates with a deep understanding of the biology of animals, who are able to communicate this knowledge and relate it to the world around them. It enables graduates to pursue careers in areas as diverse as biomedical and environmental professionals, government agencies, careers that value their training in scientific thinking and analysis, or postgraduate research. The Zoology programme is presented in an evolutionary framework and integrates all levels of animal organisation, from genes to ecosystems, reflecting the School’s research expertise. We believe that an integrative view of animal systems across these spatial and temporal scales is essential in understanding the origins and functions of the animals with which we share the planet. The programme supports the acquisition of knowledge of animal biology and the accumulation of specialised and transferable skills, via lectures, tutorials, field–based studies, laboratory-based practical classes and small-group teaching. We facilitate the development of research skills through research-led teaching, experimental and problem solving practicals, mini projects, core skills, by requiring students to engage in a capstone research project during their final year and by fostering an interest in contributing to research undertaken by the academic staff and post graduate students throughout the undergraduate programme outside the teaching semesters. The programme aims to support a systematic development of knowledge and specialised and transferable skills to deliver graduates able to find, critically appraise, synthesise and communicate existing knowledge of zoology, and with practical experience of generating and reporting new insights as independent researchers. Communication skills are assessed in a variety of written and oral formats while knowledge, attitudes and practical skills are assessed both in end of semester examinations and various online and traditional forms of continuous assessment.


1 - Interpret and understand the relationships between the diversity, classification, phylogeny and evolution of animals.
2 - Demonstrate an appreciation of the relationships between animal form and function
3 - Evidence an understanding of the principles of population, community and ecosystem ecology
4 - Evidence an understanding of the basis and process of heredity in particular an understanding how physical and behavioural traits evolve through natural and sexual selection.(
5 - Master animal identfication
6 - Evidence an understanding of the multifaceted aspects of fisheries and wildlife ecology and the factors important in the management of wild animal populations.
7 - Communicate and demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge from different scales in the biological hierarchy (genes to ecosystems) and to understand dynamic systems, interactions between systems, and change and different spatial and temporal scales.
8 - Evidence mastery of appropriate field and laboratory skills including scientific drawing, biomolecular techniques, dissection skills, sampling, note taking in the field and laboratory, compiling results, working with state of the art laboratory and field equipment, health and safety.
9 - Locate and evaluate information and to communicate that information orally and in writing, with particular awareness of traditional- and social media-based communication. The ability to think critically, including logical problem solving and writing of evidence -based synthetic critical essays.
10 - Evidence mastery of the Scientific Method and of Experimental Design, including the ability to make observations, design and conduct experiments, generate, organize and analyse datasets in different software packages and draw conclusions.
11 - Integrate research into their lives through the use of research outcomes in their day to day activities and in planning and carrying out a project where time is managed effectively
12 - Become individuals who are capable of working independently and within teams with a professional and ethical attitude to knowledge, work practices and colleagues.
Approved Additional Standards for Continuation in undergraduate degree programmes in Science (all majors):

Students who return failing grades in a semester amounting to 15 credits, or more, will be identified under the UCD Continuation and Readmission Policy. Students whose rate of progression and performance over two academic sessions (2 years) is deemed unacceptable will be referred to the Academic Council Committee on Student Conduct and Capacity for exclusion from the programme.

As Stages 3 and 4 have the most dynamic components of the programme, and the material studied previously may no longer be relevant, a student who has been away from the programme for a significant period should be required to register again to Stage 3. The upper limit for completion of Stages 3 and 4 should be six years, if they choose to do 120 credits with 20 in each year.
Stage 3

Students select seven core modules and three option modules. Students may select additional modules from within the BSc programme or alternatively, students may select 10 credits from elective modules. If you are interested in doing an Internship as part of Stage 4, you must indicate your interest now (in Stage 3). See full details www.ucd.ie/science/careers/internships/students/

Stage 4

- Students take a minimum of 60 credits from within the BSc programme. Students select one core and eight option modules. The 20 credit project module is spread over two trimesters but about 10 credits worth of work is expected to be done in Autumn. Students should bear this in mind when selecting options and balance workload across trimesters by taking a minimum of 3 option modules in Autumn and a minimum of 3 option modules in Spring.

Module ID Module Title Trimester Credits
Stage 3 Core Modules
     
ENVB30010 Systems Ecology Autumn

5

ZOOL30030 Evolutionary Biology Autumn

5

ZOOL30050 Diversity of Invertebrates Autumn

5

BIOL30030 Working with Biological Data Spring

5

ZOOL30010 Functional Morphology Spring

5

ZOOL30020 Arthropoda Spring

5

ZOOL30040 Diversity of Vertebrates Spring

5

Stage 3 Core Modules
     
Stage 3 Options - A)MIN3OF:
Students must select at least three modules from the list below.
     
BIOL30040 Scientific Writing for Biology Autumn

5

CELB20060 Principles of Cell & Molecular Biology Autumn

5

ENVB30020 Wildlife Conservation and Fisheries Management Autumn

5

ENVB30140 Analysis of Environmental Materials Autumn

5

ZOOL20020 Animal Behaviour Autumn

5

CELB30100 Developmental Biology Spring

5

ENVB20050 Principles of Environmental Biology & Ecology Spring

5

GENE20020 Principles of Genetics Spring

5

ZOOL30060 Biogeography and Field Biology Spring

5

Stage 3 Options - A)MIN3OF:
Students must select at least three modules from the list below.
     
Stage 4 Core Modules
     
BIOL40360 Research Project 2 Trimester duration (Aut-Spr)

20

Stage 4 Core Modules
     
Stage 4 Options - A)8 OF:
Students select one core and eight option modules. The 20 credit project module is spread over two trimesters but about 10 credits worth of work is expected to be done in Autumn. Students should bear this in mind when selecting options and balance their workload across trimesters by taking a minimum of three option modules in Autumn and three option modules in Spring. Please note that students who successfully completed SCI 30080 will be registered by the School to the module.
     
ENVB40030 Bioassessment of Freshwaters Autumn

5

ENVB40040 Environmental Impact Assessment Autumn

5

ENVB40540 Introduction to Ecological Mapping with open source software (QGIS) Autumn

5

SCI30080 Professional Placement-Science Autumn

5

ZOOL40040 Molecular Phylogenetics - Powers and Pitfalls Autumn

5

ZOOL40500 Ornithology Autumn

5

ENVB40020 Marine Community Ecology Spring

5

ENVB40290 Ecological Modelling Spring

5

ENVB40490 Tropical Field Ecology Spring

5

GENE40080 Population Genetics Spring

5

GENE40090 Epigenetics Spring

5

ZOOL40030 Insect-Plant Interactions Spring

5

ZOOL40280 Biological Invasions Spring

5

ZOOL40490 Wildlife Habitat Modelling for Ecology and Conservation Spring

5


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